Planting a Perennial Garden with Antique Window Accent

Planting a Perennial Garden for Next Year

Here is a great money saving tip, as the Garden Center’s mark down perennial plants at the end of the season, why not scoop them up and plant a perennial garden for next year?

You guys know how I love a pretty garden area. In fact, my previous home looked like an English cutting garden, and was one of the contributing factors of my home selling in under 2 weeks of being listed on the market, lol. I mean I got to say, it was hard for me to move away from being able to cut fresh flowers at all times from my own yard and going to nothing, but starting over has been fun too. I know what I like and what I think grows well in the Georgia, however the weather has been throwing me a few curve balls this year, and the climate is slightly different where we are located now.The majority of the flowers I added in my previous yard, since we were just starting out, came from collecting clearance and marked down, end of season perennial plants that the growers wanted to move out of their inventory.  The Speedwell seen above, we were able to pick up for only $1.99 a container instead of $5.99. The key word in that statement is “perennial,” meaning they will come back each year, unlike an annual that has to planted every year. You can get some nice varieties of perennial plants that will survive in your growing zone, you will be saving yourself some money and work in the long run. Since perennials come back every year, they will start to establish a nice deep root system which means they will get bigger fast each consecutive year. In addition to being attractive to bees and butterfly’s, which will pollinate your garden, some perennials even reseed themselves at the end of the season. Which then creates new additional plants for the following year. This makes them similar to bulbs, so they can be divided at the end of the season. Which allows you to split large plants off and have more plants or even gift them to a few of your neighbors, which so many of mine have so kindly done for me, and I plan to keep that tradition going once mine get a little bigger. 
 

Creating a Perennial Garden

The first thing in creating a perennial garden is deciding where you want to place it. You will obviously want to put it in an area that gets a fair amount of sun, depending on your plants. You also would want to select an area where you would see your lovely plants too. In our case we selected an area that is challenging to mow and the grass is not looking so great anyways. 

This area also backs up to a patio where we have placed a bench, so it no longer gets thru traffic. So, we decided to continue the planter bed that already runs the length of our home to make the new perennial garden. First we removed the grass by using a flat shovel, if you do this carefully you can create sod pieces that can be used to fill in areas in your yard that might be patchy. Once the grass is removed you will want to layout where your plants are going in the newly formed bed. In our local garden center today we have lucked upon some gorgeous Cone Flower, Black Eyed Susan’s and Crystal Peak Obedient plants for our DIY butterfly garden. These will all be great pollinators and provide pretty spring, summer and fall color for our garden, for years to come.Make sure to refer to the growing chart on the plant and place the taller plants to the back of your garden. While this might seem like a very basic tip, let me just say; the landscapers installing our plants when we closed on our home actually placed the five gigantic shrubs you now see along the side of my house, in the picture above, in front of tiny miniature boxwoods in my front planter bed. This was directly off of my front porch, which I knew had to be moved and were immediately moved one month after closing.  As you can see now, we would have 6-8 ft tall shrubs blocking my front porch. 

As you plant each of the plants you will want to dig the hole slightly bigger than the plant and we always amend our soil. I am sure that in other areas you can probably get away with not amending your soil, but here in Georgia we have red clay soil so it must be amended. Our secret mix is soil conditioner and growing mix. 

Once you have planted your beauties, always makes sure to mulch them properly. Mulch will help to hold water in your beds and keep the weeds out. In our previous yard we used to place landscape fabric down for weed control, but I have since given up on that process. I personally have realized that I would rather spend the money on mulch and if you mulch it thick enough you will not have a weed problem, and your plant moisture levels will be better. Besides weeds will grow through the landscape fabric after a year or two anyways, so why bother? 

Another great gardening tip I have learned over the years, is to always keep one of each plant tag for reference. I have found that these can be of value later down the road.  I like to be able to review the specific manufacture growing specifications for each plant for pruning times, fertilization, plant variety, and bloom times. Also they come in handy if you need to replace a specific type of plant due to disease and you want to match the grouping or color cluster. 

*Please note that this post may contain affiliate links for your convenience. These involve no extra cost to you, but may result in me receiving a small commission – for which I am very grateful! You can view my full advertising disclosure here.

I personally use a inexpensive Dollar Tree plastic storage bin to keep them in with my other gardening supplies in the basement. These bins are really perfect for bulb storage for the winter months, gloves, shovels, garden stakes and other muddy or dirty yard tools. Since they are plastic, they clean up easily and since they are from the Dollar Tree you can easily replace them if they break or if you need additional bins for your growing gardening needs. 

Now that we have the perennial garden done I want to share how we installed an antique window accent above our truck bench. I am not even going to lie, one of my sweet neighbors has an old farmhouse window on her front porch that I have loved since the day we moved in. So, this particular inspiration comes directly from her porch, since I see it every time I leave the neighborhood. Jenni, thank you for having such a great eye for farmhouse design! I have finally found a window with enough mass, that will work over my beautiful, beast of a bench, that was custom created for me by TJ Parten at Parten’s Projects.  So, now I totally admit that I am now going to hang the window in the exact same fashion that my sweet neighbor did, and here is the DIY of how we hung ours.

First I had to refinish the window since it was a reclaimed window, it was stained on one side and painted on the other. I really liked the two tones but I wanted the trim color to match our house trim color and the stain to match our bench. Then we added a large eye hook to the top corners of the window, careful not to crack the window glass. Two additional eye hooks were purchased to be placed into the bottom edge of our screened deck to hang the window. Then my husband used vinyl coated aircraft cable to suspend the window from the upper deck base. If you have not worked with aircraft cable before, it is very durable, weather resistant, and can hold a ton of weight. Plus it allows you to create any custom lengths of cable your heart desires. 

You will have to purchase the special crimping tool called a swag tool, seen above. This is what will crimp the aircraft cable to hold the loops in place. The entire process was so simple, I was completely shocked that we had not used this product before. Once both sets of the loops were attached to the window, we measured the desired drop length and added two more loops with the addition eye hooks. The final step was to hang the window which was done by my husband setting the window atop a ladder and screwing the eye hooks into the pre drilled pilot holes in the under side of our deck. 

I really think this is the perfect finishing touch for this sweet little perennial garden, and it gives the illusion of a garden wall, or even the side of the house. I love that you can still the tailgate portion of my bench. Which makes this perfect for tailgating season, as it arrives this fall. Since I have a tailgate on the patio it could be fun to have tailgating parties on my patio, lol. I hope you have enjoyed our little perennial garden tutorial and it has inspired you to plant a perennial garden of your own. I am looking forward to the seeing these pretty flowers year after year and hopefully being able to divide them and share a few of them with some of my new neighbors, as they move in to our neighborhood. 

*Please note that this post may contain affiliate links for your convenience. These involve no extra cost to you, but may result in me receiving a small commission – for which I am very grateful! You can view my full advertising disclosure here.

RON’S TOOL BOX: 

  

PIN ME for later and be sure to follow us on Pinterest at Jen @ JENRON DESIGNS

28 Comments

  1. I absolutely love this! what a lovely little perennial garden. I can’t wait to buy a house just so I can arrange my own garden. Thank you for the inspo, I love reading your posts – I’m always left inspired.

  2. This is a great idea! First love all the flowers you chose and that dodge bench is so so cool!

  3. This is a beautiful garden. I don’t really know what I’m doing in my garden but it looks beautiful somehow. You’ve inspired me to learn more though.

  4. This is beautiful! I love perennials. Living in an apartment I need things that are smaller containers and these are perfect!

  5. Oh Jen I love this window and you know I love that bench. Your yard always gives me such inspiration and now I know you secrets, catching those end of season deals, that is so smart.

  6. What a beautiful garden! Your old garden sounds like a paradise, I have always wanted a large garden filled with flowers to cut and arrange. I like your tip about buying perennials when they are marked down! I like doing this with planters during the end of the season…it’s a great way to save some money!!

  7. These flowers look so good and such great tips on gardening. A great helpful post indeed. Keep up the good work.

  8. Very helpful post! I’m into gardening but I don’t have enough space in our place right now. Your perennial garden is beautiful and relaxing. Thanks for the tutorial! Love it!

  9. I’ve always loved gardening and you have provided so much insight here! Thank you! Also, love that window accent, and the truck tailgate bench!

  10. Laura you should do a vertical garden, up and exterior wall if you have a patio, that is removable of course. Those are so hot right now and perfect for limited space.

  11. I love seeing peoples beautiful flowers. I live in an apartment so the most I can do is a couple of containers on my patio.

  12. Oh Lindsay thank you and I am so laughing out loud about the “good egg” part, that is just too funny! Now I will be speaking in my Veruca Salt voice for the rest of the day which will thrill my husband to no end 😀 “Because I want a Oompa Loompa NOW!!!!!” YEs say a little prayer for Mr. Gainer it will be long day for him.

  13. You know Jo, we have all bought the weed mats and tuff blocker in hopes that it would work, but unfortunately they just deteriorate like anything else put in the ground. I will say when we young, and had no money at all, we used wet newspaper and it actually worked pretty well for about a year. So I guess I should say it worked as well as the plastic weed shields you can buy, plus it was free and the perfect way to compost or recycle, LOL.

  14. We used weed mats, but they don’t work. at all. Weeds are cropping up everywhere and I’m trying not to look at them. I’ll probably have to get proper mulch to handle them. Thanks for your tips.

  15. I really like your little variation and how you explain every little thing with the help of pictures. Commendable! Love it. I’ll definitely make this little perennial garden when I shifted in my new house.

  16. This is such an informative post. I have a black thumb and can use all the help I can get.

  17. How beautiful! I love how you laid out the plants in their pots. I need to remember to do that.

  18. I love the garden, but I really love how you hung that old reclaimed window, that is so me. It is super sweet how you gave props to your neighbor for the idea too, I bet she is just beaming that you mentioned her in your post, I know I would be. Your a good egg Jen Gainer 🙂

  19. Oh, I love this post. I’m a gardener at heart, but sadly don’t have a green thumb. Our yard is quite large and was very overgrown when we bought the place – we’ve been battling with it ever since. My dream is to have an English tea garden – wild, yet tamed. Right, now though, I think some perennial gardens would be a good start!

  20. This is a great blog. I am pretty much impressed with your good work. You really put out very helpful information.

  21. So glad you find this post helpful Katie! I promise now is the time of year to buy perennials since they will come back every year, you will save a ton on moola. If you are not sure about the variety of plant, you can google the specifics for your growing zone to check it out.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *