Vertical Pallet Herb Garden

Vertical Pallet Herb Garden

Please join us for a closer look at our hanging herb garden, made from reclaimed pallets and terra-cotta pots. 

 I have receive so many comments, emails and texts from you all asking about the details on how to make the DIY Herb Garden project.  So….. I will be the first one to admit I might have dropped the ball on that follow up article to our DIY PATIO PAVER PROJECT, which would have covered all that information. I did get engulfed in the One Room Challenge, but in my defense I only had 6 weeks to get the Sleeping Porch done, and now I have shamelessly plugged it again…with a link, in case you missed it., or sign up for our bi- monthly newsletter: 

Basically this is an easy weekend project, that takes very little time, money, or effort.

Here is what you will need:

When picking pallets to utilize for furniture or wall treatments, you really want to make sure of two things. 1. What are the pallets are made out of and 2. What did the pallets originally transport. Some pallets have housed potential poisonous substances, while others are made out of wood treated with poisonous substances, and these are not suitable for reuse. 1001 pallets is a great resource for looking up this information and has a great article available at this (article link). I have included a copy of the pallet codes below from 1001 pallets, these are for the wood type used to make the pallets.  Our pallet was HT and were originally used to ship the components of rock fireplace ……bet you can’t guess where I got those from….maybe the patio paver project? We were very lucky and received out shipment on a double wide pallet. 

Once you have your pallet and you have painted it with your choice of Exterior Paint – we used our leftover trim paint TRIM PAINT- City Loft Sherwin Williams. You will want to adhere the pallet to the wall or surface to create the vertical garden. For this we used 4″ decking wood screws drilled directly into studs. We did this just to make sure that the pallet frame could hold the weight of the pots, soil, plants and water weight. 

Then for a rustic farmhouse look  we attached adjustable metal worm gear clamps, available in the HVAC area of your local hardware store, with 1/2″ metal screws. The clamps are adjustable from 3-4″ so you terra-cotta pot can vary a bit in size.  Insert your terra-cotta pot add soil and herbs. Voila, Instant Herb Garden!!!

Just for ease of maintenance we added a small coil water hose  so we can keep the herbs misted in the hot Georgia heat.

We routed the water from a nearby hose bib with a small light weight hose pipe, then attached a hanger to hold the coiled water hose and nozzle. 

If you notice we also chose to locate our herb garden on a wall under our deck. This will help filter the amount of direct sun the plants get. Most herbs prefer filtered sunlight especially the fragile ones like basil and cilantro. The deck also protects these delicate plants from harsh rain storms as well, that will beat them down and break the stems, leaving you with limp droopy herbs.   

Since the entire herb wall is easily rearrangeable, by simply lifting out the pots, you can also relocate plants based on the amount of sun or shade they require. I placed my heartier plants like sage, dill, parsley, oregano and lavender that prefer more sunlight at the edge of the deck to get morning sun. 

Planting Tip: I personally like to use Miracle Grow Moisture Control soil, it keeps the soil moist even if I miss a day of watering…which is critical down here in the south. I also like to use Bonnie’s Veggie and Herb fertilizer for big healthy plants. 

I plant all kinds of herbs for many different purposes. This is a common sage which is handy to keep around. It is pretty good for stuffing and poultry recipes. Not to mention if your home has not been feeling very zen, you can always burn some, with the Native American art of smudging. In case you are not familiar here is a great article about The Ancient Art of Smudging. 

Check out this super healthy dill which is great on grilled fish with fresh lemon or to make a dill dip. Below is one of the 3 kinds of  basil we planted. It seems we use a lot of basil around here. Of course one of our favorite simple summer time suppers is a Caprese salad.  Ummm sliced fresh buffalo mozzarella, heirloom tomatoes, and green basil, seasoned with salt and olive oil. Of course I love the Tuscan Olive Oil from a local shop in Roswell OLI+VE, yes to me it makes a huge difference.

Like what you see, what to get all the fun herbaceous recipes we make with these glorious greens? Be sure to sign up for our bi-monthly newsletter

A Day at Gibbs Gardens

“My Little Buttercup, has the sweetest smile”. Spend a day at Gibbs Gardens we us,  to enjoy the beautiful floral clad country side.

Join us as we explore the miles of rolling hills filled with buttercups. See one of the most sought after Easter picture venues of North Georgia. Learn about different types of buttercups and when to plant for the best spring showing. 

 Over the past weekend we took our annual spring journey to Gibbs Garden’s to see the Daffodils, which is really quite magical. If you have never been, I highly recommend that you make a trip soon while they are still blooming. There are literally thousands of buttercups, covering the north Georgia hillside. A total feast for your eyes.

It is no secret to any north Georgia native that Gibbs Garden’s is the perfect garden spot to take pictures. Whether you are a trying to get the perfect family Easter photo, hone your photography skills or just create a cute seasonal profile picture, Gibbs’s has you covered. We love to go for gardening inspiration for our own yard and we get a little exercise at the same time. My husband and I are garden members, and have the 4 season pass so we can explore the gardens at all times of the year. Honestly, it just makes senses to purchase the 4 seasons pass, the cost is the same price of two single day visits. So if your go to the gardens at least twice your pass pays for itself, plus you get two free one day visitor passes, which I use for out of town guests that come to visit. 

Garden Tip: The gardens offer summer concerts, featuring local bands, with a option to purchase a light picnic dinner and drinks. This is by far one of the best ways to see the gardens for a date night. Take a pretty stroll have a little dinner, some vino under the stars and musical entertainment. 

What is the difference between a Buttercup and a Daffodil?  Actually, there is a huge difference between the two. Everything you will see at Gibbs Gardens are Daffodils, also known as Narcissus or Jonquils, depending on variety.  There is not a single buttercup. As a southern girl, I grew up calling all these pretties, “buttercups”. Truth be told Buttercups are actually a completely different species of flowers that looks nothing like daffodils

Although, I do think most of the confusion for me comes from the movie Willie Wonka…. I know random, right? You know the scene where Gene Wilder picks a daffodil and drinks butterscotch out of it like a teacup. Then proceeds to eat the cup, which by the way are poisonous to humans and animals. Way to go Hollywood, you ruined an entire generation!!! Obviously that stuck with me, as I am still guilty of calling them buttercups to this day, as you can see by my catchy little title above. 

Let’s take a more in depth look at the types of beautiful daffodils that grow at Gibbs and are available to plant in your own yard.  First of all, in Georgia it’s best to plant your bulbs in the fall. Bulbs need that freeze of winter in order to produce the pretty flowers. If you missed planting it’s ok go ahead and buy some pre grown bulbs in containers at your local garden center. Just remember at the end of their season as the foliage dies off to put them into the ground so they will return next year. This is probably the most recognized, and common daffodils known as February Gold. It’s a top-notch choice and one of the most reliable of daffodils, it’s provide fast early color in the garden. This early-blooming gem offers clear golden-yellow single blooms with rounded petals and long trumpets. (Trumpets also called cups and are located in the center of the daffodil’s star shaped petals. 

Ice Follies is another favorite here and in the South. This single bloom, large flowers has white petals and wide, frilled cups that open lemon yellow and will fade into a creamy white. Thus the name Ice Follies since they will end up all white.  It’s vigorous heavy bloomer, and has a light scented, too.Canaliculatus or aka Avalanche, is a robust  miniature daffodil.  It will grow 8-10 clusters of white flowers with small lemon yellow cups per stalk.   It is strongly scented, making an excellent choice for cut flowers. It grows best in a slightly sheltered environment where it will not be damaged by early strong winds. It’s a particularly good choice for Southern gardeners.

This is one of my personal all time favorites, the rare Narcissus Romance. I just love these beautiful ruffled pink-cup daffodils. This single bloom charmer has an unusual rosy pink cup against beautiful large creamy white petals. They usually bloom mid spring and are the only pink cup daffodil variety available.Now this variety looks very similar to the previous one, as you can tell.  Except this is a small-cup miniature variety known as, Merlin Narcissus. The Merlin’s offer a crisp white petal and a tiny yellow cup ringed in a bright orange-red. The single bloom flowers will last a long time, and are considered statement flowers. The Bantam daffodil, is another one of my favorites. This delightful dwarf daffodil has small neat very rounded bright yellow petals with a brilliant red rimmed cup. The petals are slightly reflexed or blown back. It is a regular winner among floral grower’s competitions with it’s sturdy and upright stiff stems.These beauties are common known as Jetfire Narcissus or Cyclamineus. They are gorgeous when blooming, as the Jetfire offers clear golden petals with a contrasting orange trumpet. They usually bloom early spring and are very reliable while offering a bold color combination to your garden. Easily mixed with other early bulbs like crocus and grape hyacinth for beautiful color combinations. Jack Snipe is another type of dwarf  hybrid daffodil. The swept back creamy petals give the flower it’s nickname of “sailboat”. The dark yellow primrose cup makes a striking contrast. This vigorous daffodil is perfect for borders in sun or shade and is excellent for naturalising . This is the most common southern mini daffodil, known as Little Gems. In England they call them Johnny Jump Ups. This early-blooming gem offers clear golden-yellow blooms with long trumpets, ‘Little Gem’ is a vigorous dwarf trumpet daffodil.  It’s a very reliable choice among daffodils, it’s  provides extra early seasonal color in your garden.

 

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